smartgirlsattheparty:

Smarties, what inspires you?

smartgirlsattheparty:

Smarties, what inspires you?

(Source: asarttherapy)

nevertoooldtolovemuppets:

Love these pictures! This seems similar to what I (kind of) did with Walter plush when I went to Italy last year. Awesome!

(Source: theinturnetexplorer)

tastefullyoffensive:

How cowlicks actually happen.

[myfavoritekirby]

miketrap:

The Princess Bride, 25 years later. This pic makes me smile.

miketrap:

The Princess Bride, 25 years later. This pic makes me smile.

(via miketrap-deactivated20140615)

"

School officials say the books are not technically banned, just redistributed to the library. But what good is having works from the reading list — like “Los Tucsonenses: The Mexican Community in Tucson, 1854-1941” and “The House on Mango Street,” by Sandra Cisneros — on the shelves if they can’t be taught? Indeed, the point of dismantling the curriculum was to end classroom discussions about these books.

That’s where Mr. Diaz’s “librotraficantes,” or book traffickers, come in. “Arizona tried to erase our history,” he says. “So we’re making more.”

"

— Books Without Borders (via librarianrafia)

(Source: The New York Times, via librarianrafia)

goodmexicangirl:

#GoodMexicanGirl #specialorder #librotraficante

goodmexicangirl:

#GoodMexicanGirl #specialorder #librotraficante

floricanto-desnuda:

Librotraficante, which is Spanish for “book smuggler”, sought monetary and book donations to keep Mexican-American studies alive. House Bill 2281 was pulling classics such as Sandra Cisneros’ The House on Mango Street and Dagoberto Gilb’s Woodcuts of Women off library shelves and out of school…

(Source: floricanto-canela)

sciencesoup:

Creativity in Science

They should have sent a poet,” whispers Ellie in the 1997 film Contact. She is a radio astronomer, and when sets eyes on an alien galaxy for the first time, she has no words for its beauty. Despite being fiction, I think this interestingly highlight for pursuits in arts and sciences to be cross-disciplinary. Many students lose interest in science at an early age because it’s largely “taught to the test”, and so there is a decreased focus on creativity and imagination. Even practical experiments allow little room for creativity, as students all expected to get the same results—and although this is important for teaching the scientific method, careers in science are not entirely like this: they require creativity and innovation. The infographic above shows the results of Creativity and Education: Why it Matters, a survey by research firm Edelman Berland (note: it is not specifically science-related). The research shows that that 85% of participants think creativity is crucial for problem solving in their career, yet 32% don’t feel comfortable thinking creatively. Yet, creativity is what keeps science moving forwards, because it fosters new connections and therefore gives rise to not only practical innovation, but also the creation of new knowledge. Scientists and engineers frequently encounter problems where they must use abstract, creative thinking, and they should be equipped to do this. From an early age, students should be encouraged to let their imaginations run wild, and also to use scientific reasoning to assess and test their ideas—and this approach of being open to multiple disciplines would be beneficial not only to science, but also foster innovation in other disciplines too. In Einstein’s words: “Imagination is more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited to all we now know and understand, while imagination embraces the entire world, and all there ever will be to know and understand.

mathmonahan:

Some process shots of drowning books.

(via teachingliteracy)

bellavidaletty:

Puerto Rico art history. Plaza San José (1963) 
Medio:Óleo sobre masoniteColección:Colección  Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico 1998Manuel Hernández AcevedoAguas Buenas, Puerto Rico1921 - 1988
Pintor y artista gráfico.

bellavidaletty:

Puerto Rico art history. Plaza San José (1963) 

Medio:Óleo sobre masoniteColección:Colección  Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico 1998Manuel Hernández AcevedoAguas Buenas, Puerto Rico1921 - 1988

Pintor y artista gráfico.

teachingliteracy:

iheartclassics: Heather Baird’s creative concoctions at Sprinkle Bakes!
sprinklebakes:
Portrait of Poe in Red Velvet.